A FREE Social Story for Feeding Therapy

Ah, Social Stories…aren’t they great?  Such a simple technique, but oh so affective.  Better yet, they can be used for nearly ANY speech and language problem!

If you’ve never heard of Social Stories, here’s the run-down.  Social Stories were developed by Carol Gray.  Please visit her website at TheGrayCenter.org for more information.  Basically, a social story describes in an easy and simply manner a situation or concept that a child is having difficulty with.  The story should be told from the child’s perspective and should be easily understood by the child.  Social stories were originally created for children with Autism in order to help them understand social situations, and they are still most often used for this population.  However, social stories can be used for many different clients and situations, regardless of age or target goal.  Really, if there is a problem that a child is having difficulty understanding, social stories can almost always be used as a technique to help address the problem.  I personally have used social stories with children with hearing impairments, behavioral problems, autism, language disorders, and feeding issues.

The most recent social story I have written was for a client with a feeding disorder.  He experienced a traumatic eating incident and will now only eat pureed foods.  I wrote a social story to help address his fear of eating solid foods.  In it, I discuss how he used to enjoy all kinds of food, but then something got stuck in his throat, and now he only likes soft food.  I’ve attached a generic version of the social story below.  Remember, social stories should be individualized for the child, but in order to protect his privacy, I have omitted all personal pictures and information.  Feel free to download this freebie and adjust it to fit your needs for your student or child!

foodfeeding social story

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One thought on “A FREE Social Story for Feeding Therapy

  1. Pingback: Friday Favs: 5/10/13 | The Speech Clinic

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